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My Ultimate Caribbean Coffee recipe


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Paul B avatar image
Paul B 🇺🇸 | 452 ratings Author Posted 25 Jun '22

The only reason that I keep any rums from El Dorado on hand is that their 8 year old makes for a perfect Caribbean Coffee. It has been 3 months since I opened that bottle because that is all that I use it for.

As with any other great dish, one must only use the finest of ingredients. Start with 3 TBS of dark roast Central American Arabica ground coffee (no substitutes).  I used to grind my own beans, but that is serious overkill.  I have a small pot to brew it with 2.5 cups of water, which makes for a perfect his and hers. No two people can agree on how a coffee is to be made.

Once brewed, do not leave it on the fire for long, as this is one sure way to ruin it. Pour it into your favorite cup and add 1 tsp of demerara sugar. Then add a maximum of 3 tsp of creamer. Then comes the rum, usually about 2 ounces of ED8.  This will make for an absolutely wonderful way to start one's day!!! No other rum can be used!!!!

DB avatar image
DB 🇺🇸 | 28 ratings Replied 25 Jun '22

Sounds good! I don't have that particular coffee, but I've always got Demerara sugar / syrup around, and creamer (do you have a recommendation on that?). I'll have to source the right coffee, but I'd like to try this.

Do you do tiki? FWIW, if you do, you should try the ED8 (and 12!) in the Ancient Mariner tiki cocktail with Coruba Dark. I know you are not an El Dorado fan, but it does have its place for sure in other drinks!

bar la moura avatar image
bar la moura 🇭🇷 | 119 ratings Replied 26 Jun '22

Paul i like your recipe just here we prefer esprersso coffee (the more arabica percentage the better it is)

we drink coffee like italians, short and strong, than of course we can add rum and sugar, so if i do

the coffee like you do it will be not good, can try it same but do a medium (not too short) espresso or

maybe a double espresso, now i must buy the el dorado 8, new version is also sugar free ?

Scott T avatar image
Scott T 🇺🇸 | 122 ratings Replied 27 Jun '22

Have to disagree with you here, grinding your own beans is not overkill it is necessity.  I would no sooner use pre-ground coffee than I would use bottled lime juice in my Mai-tais or margaritas. 

 

bar la moura avatar image
bar la moura 🇭🇷 | 119 ratings Replied 27 Jun '22

i also never buy pre ground coffee, we grind it in the bar and also at home ... and i agree with Scott that fresh lime juice is 100% better than bottled lime juice ... 

Paul B avatar image
Paul B 🇺🇸 | 452 ratings Author Replied 27 Jun '22

Many years ago, I tried severral bags of beans from Target. I ground them up and this was a way for me to try coffees from all over the world. No one liked the ones from Indonesia. Coffee supposedly originally came from Ethiopia. I alwys thought that Columbian and Jamaican coffees were too smooth for my tastes. The only problem with the ones from Target was that if I really liked a bag, it probably would not be available on my next visit since these were from independent farmers. Then Target closed their store closest to me. I am not about to drive 30 miles or so just to get coffee beans.

Then my quest continued. Gevalia and Starbucks are highly over rated in my book. Mass produced coffees are made with robusta beans grown on the lower volcanic slopes of places like Brazil and Vietnam. These are high in caffeine and low on flavor. Arabica beans are grown on the upper slopes and are known for flavor and less caffeine. I don't drink coffee for the jolt and I don't drink it every day.  Espressos are popular in Cuban and Middle Eastern restaurants in these parts.

Growing up in New Orleans, we all got raised on Coffee with Chicory. During the Great Depresssion, real coffee was in short supply, so chicory was added. I no longer touch these fake coffees. I now only buy French Market Restaurant Blend Arabica Dark Roast ground. As I open each can, I pour it into two of those Talenti Gelato reusable plastic containers to be stored in the fridge. This works quite well for me.

bar la moura avatar image
bar la moura 🇭🇷 | 119 ratings Replied 27 Jun '22

yes Paul always arabica, usually coffee here are blends, but all coffee varieties can be divided in 2 great groups, arabica nad robusta, arabica is about strength and flavor, robusta is only to get some cream on top, we use (in the bar) a good italian brand (ok the brand is austrian, but the coffee is roasted and blended in vicenza, italy), 95% arabica, the coffee is expensive but if the machine is ok (regulary cleaned and serviced), the coffee is really perfect, last 15 - 20 years i drink coffee withot milk and sugar (short espresso) so i really feel the quality of the coffee ...

Paul B avatar image
Paul B 🇺🇸 | 452 ratings Author Replied 27 Jun '22

I don't always add rum to my coffee, but I have tried several different ones. My first hunch was to add Dictodor 12 or Dictador 20, but the coffee notes in those rums actually do not compliment the coffee. So I tried El Dorado 8 a few years ago and have stuck with that one. I might add that this Caribbean Coffee is a totally different animal from espresso.

bar la moura avatar image
bar la moura 🇭🇷 | 119 ratings Replied 27 Jun '22

of course it is but i m sure it s good, we serve irish (with jameson whiskey), cubano (havana 3 rum and some white cocoa liquer), french (gran marnier orange cognac liquor), spanish carajillo (licor 43) coffee, all coffees with some alcohol inside :-)

Scott T avatar image
Scott T 🇺🇸 | 122 ratings Replied 27 Jun '22

There are actually good quality robusta beans, but they are not that common.  Some very pricey high-caffeine brands such as Death Wish coffee use them.  I actually bought a bag but was underwhelmed by both the mild flavor and the caffeine buzz I got, but they didn't taste like burnt rubber like some cheap robusta do. 

 

The standard Starbucks stuff such as Pike's Peak and House blend are quite overrated, but they do have some lesser known ones such as the Verona blend and Sumatra that are very good.  The single origin are also very good but quite pricey.  I get a big bag of their winter blend every year when it goes on sale at Costco and it is very decent. 

Paul B avatar image
Paul B 🇺🇸 | 452 ratings Author Replied 4 Jul '22

It was good to see so many responses on Caribbean Coffee. Any time that I thought of products from the Caribbean other than produce, it had to be rum, coffee, and music.

I did  a lot of research on Caribbean coffees and found the path of the original beans. Here they are in order: Ethiopia, Arabian Peninsula, Europe, MARTINIQUE, and then the remainder of the Caribbean with the right climate for growing.

My research also reminded me of that bag of beans called Costa Rican Tarrazu that I had about 20 years ago. To my surprise, it is readily available and affordable. And not so affordable is Panamanian Geisha. However, that one is so smooth that I would be wasting my money on it.

bar la moura avatar image
bar la moura 🇭🇷 | 119 ratings Replied 4 Jul '22

https://www.uncommoncaribbean.com/martinique/taste-of-the-caribbean-tracing-the-roots-of-americas-coffee-addiction-to-martinique/

here is the legend of a french man who brought the first coffee tree in martinique, i learned this story when in martinique, remember bringing home some coffee from this island too ...

Paul B avatar image
Paul B 🇺🇸 | 452 ratings Author Replied 4 Jul '22

bar la moura:

That is a truly fascinating story, even if some of it may never be known if it was true. His fellow officer must have thought, "What in hell are you going to do with that stupid plant?" The birth of 20 million coffee trees on Martinique alone!

 

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